A Harbinger Not To Be Ignored

As I watched CNN’s coverage of Hurricane Isaac barreling towards the Louisiana coast seven years to the day after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans with such devastation, my thoughts turned to the ‘approaching storm’ described by Jonathan Cahn in his book The Harbinger.    I had purchased a copy of Cahn’s controversial work with a degree of hesitation, wondering, “Was this a worthwhile read, or was it just another case of someone making sensational—even wackypredictions of future events based on unsound biblical scholarship, and therefore best ignored?” I’m glad I didn’t ignore it, for I would have missed a truly thought-provoking book. 

In The Harbinger, Cahn proposes that the fates of two nations uniquely-favoured by God, ancient Israel and the USA, are mysteriously linked. Cahn makes such a linkage between the two nations, one ancient and one modern, based on the similarity between their responses to God’s signs, or harbingers, of impending judgment. In the Eighth Century BC, the northern kingdom of Israel had turned away from God.  In 732 BC, God removed the hedge of protection around ancient Israel, allowing the Assyrians to invade their land, but only on a small-scale and only temporarily. This breach in Israel’s security was meant to be a first warning sign to Israel to return to their Covenant LORD.  But instead of turning back to God after the calamity, the people of Israel, in a spirit of pride and arrogance, determined to rebuild bigger, better, stronger.  Their response is recorded in Isaiah 9:10:

   “The bricks have fallen down,

    But we will rebuild with smooth stones;

    The sycamores have been cut down,

    But we will replace them with cedars.” (NASB)

The northern kingdom of Israel ignored all nine harbingers sent by God. A mere ten years after the first ‘wake-up call’, the northern kingdom was annihilated by the Assyrians and subsequently disappeared from the face of the earth.  Cahn claims that the nine harbingers that appeared in the last days of ancient Israel are now appearing in America.  He regards the 9/11 terrorist attack as the first of nine harbingers sent by God to America, on a par with the Assyrian breach of the northern kingdom in 732 BC. 

As Cahn goes on to show, the parallels between the actions of ancient Israel and America are truly uncanny!  To cite only one of many parallels:  A number of prominent US leaders and politicians (or their speech writers, most likely), unaware of the passage’s connection to impending divine judgment, unwittingly quoted Isaiah 9:10 to inspire the American people post 9/11.  America has been given all nine harbingers that Israel received, and like Israel, responds with arrogant defiance.  But unlike ancient Israel, America still has time to return to God and thus avert judgment.

The parallels that Cahn finds between ancient Israel and America are remarkable. However, one problem I have with Cahn’s linkage of ancient Israel and the USA is this:  The prophet Isaiah delivered a specific message to a specific people at a specific point in history, the ancient northern kingdom of Israel in the 8th century BC.  Can we apply Isaiah’s prophetic utterances literally to 21st century America?  I’m not so sure.  Another problem:  Cahn, clearly, has written The Harbinger  as a warning for America.  That America is in a state of spiritual and moral decline is indisputable.  However, just how does a nation go about returning to God?  I think it’s a matter of individual, and not national, response.  Governments cannot legislate faith.  History has given us some sorry examples of governments who tried.    

 

 

 

    

 

         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Harbinger Not To Be Ignored

As I watched CNN’s coverage of Hurricane Isaac barreling towards the Louisiana coast seven years to the day after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans with such devastation, my thoughts turned to the ‘approaching storm’ described by Jonathan Cahn in his book The Harbinger.    I had purchased a copy of Cahn’s controversial work with a degree of hesitation, wondering, “Was this a worthwhile read, or was it just another case of someone making sensational—even wackypredictions of future events based on unsound biblical scholarship, and therefore best ignored?” I’m glad I didn’t ignore it, for I would have missed a truly thought-provoking book. 

 

In The Harbinger, Cahn proposes that the fates of two nations uniquely-favoured by God, ancient Israel and the USA, are mysteriously linked. Cahn makes such a linkage between the two nations, one ancient and one modern, based on the similarity between their responses to God’s signs, or harbingers, of impending judgment. In the Eighth Century BC, the northern kingdom of Israel had turned away from God.  In 732 BC, God removed the hedge of protection around ancient Israel, allowing the Assyrians to invade their land, but only on a small-scale and only temporarily. This breach in Israel’s security was meant to be a first warning sign to Israel to return to their Covenant LORD.  But instead of turning back to God after the calamity, the people of Israel, in a spirit of pride and arrogance, determined to rebuild bigger, better, stronger.  Their response is recorded in Isaiah 9:10:

 

            “The bricks have fallen down,

            But we will rebuild with smooth stones;

The sycamores have been cut down,

But we will replace them with cedars.” (NASB)

 

The northern kingdom of Israel ignored all nine harbingers sent by God. A mere ten years after the first ‘wake-up call’, the northern kingdom was annihilated by the Assyrians and subsequently disappeared from the face of the earth.  Cahn claims that the nine harbingers that appeared in the last days of ancient Israel are now appearing in America.  He regards the 9/11 terrorist attack as the first of nine harbingers sent by God to America, on a par with the Assyrian breach of the northern kingdom in 732 BC. 

 

As Cahn goes on to show, the parallels between the actions of ancient Israel and America are truly uncanny!  To cite only one of many parallels:  A number of prominent US leaders and politicians (or their speech writers, most likely), unaware of the passage’s connection to impending divine judgment, unwittingly quoted Isaiah 9:10 to inspire the American people post 9/11.  America has been given all nine harbingers that Israel received, and like Israel, responds with arrogant defiance.  But unlike ancient Israel, America still has time to return to God and thus avert judgment.

 

The parallels that Cahn finds between ancient Israel and America are remarkable. However, one problem I have with Cahn’s linkage of ancient Israel and the USA is this:  The prophet Isaiah delivered a specific message to a specific people at a specific point in history, the ancient northern kingdom of Israel in the 8th century.  Can we apply Isaiah’s prophetic utterances literally to 21st century America?  I’m not so sure.  Another problem:  Cahn, clearly, has written The Harbinger  as a warning for America.  That America is in a state of spiritual and moral decline is indisputable.  However, just how does a nation go about returning to God?  I think it’s a matter of individual, and not national, response.  Governments cannot legislate faith.  History has given us some sorry examples of governments who tried.    

 

 

 

    

 

         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Harbinger Not To Be Ignored

As I watched CNN’s coverage of Hurricane Isaac barreling towards the Louisiana coast seven years to the day after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans with such devastation, my thoughts turned to the ‘approaching storm’ described by Jonathan Cahn in his book The Harbinger.    I had purchased a copy of Cahn’s controversial work with a degree of hesitation, wondering, “Was this a worthwhile read, or was it just another case of someone making sensational—even wackypredictions of future events based on unsound biblical scholarship, and therefore best ignored?” I’m glad I didn’t ignore it, for I would have missed a truly thought-provoking book. 

 

In The Harbinger, Cahn proposes that the fates of two nations uniquely-favoured by God, ancient Israel and the USA, are mysteriously linked. Cahn makes such a linkage between the two nations, one ancient and one modern, based on the similarity between their responses to God’s signs, or harbingers, of impending judgment. In the Eighth Century BC, the northern kingdom of Israel had turned away from God.  In 732 BC, God removed the hedge of protection around ancient Israel, allowing the Assyrians to invade their land, but only on a small-scale and only temporarily. This breach in Israel’s security was meant to be a first warning sign to Israel to return to their Covenant LORD.  But instead of turning back to God after the calamity, the people of Israel, in a spirit of pride and arrogance, determined to rebuild bigger, better, stronger.  Their response is recorded in Isaiah 9:10:

 

            “The bricks have fallen down,

            But we will rebuild with smooth stones;

The sycamores have been cut down,

But we will replace them with cedars.” (NASB)

 

The northern kingdom of Israel ignored all nine harbingers sent by God. A mere ten years after the first ‘wake-up call’, the northern kingdom was annihilated by the Assyrians and subsequently disappeared from the face of the earth.  Cahn claims that the nine harbingers that appeared in the last days of ancient Israel are now appearing in America.  He regards the 9/11 terrorist attack as the first of nine harbingers sent by God to America, on a par with the Assyrian breach of the northern kingdom in 732 BC. 

 

As Cahn goes on to show, the parallels between the actions of ancient Israel and America are truly uncanny!  To cite only one of many parallels:  A number of prominent US leaders and politicians (or their speech writers, most likely), unaware of the passage’s connection to impending divine judgment, unwittingly quoted Isaiah 9:10 to inspire the American people post 9/11.  America has been given all nine harbingers that Israel received, and like Israel, responds with arrogant defiance.  But unlike ancient Israel, America still has time to return to God and thus avert judgment.

 

The parallels that Cahn finds between ancient Israel and America are remarkable. However, one problem I have with Cahn’s linkage of ancient Israel and the USA is this:  The prophet Isaiah delivered a specific message to a specific people at a specific point in history, the ancient northern kingdom of Israel in the 8th century.  Can we apply Isaiah’s prophetic utterances literally to 21st century America?  I’m not so sure.  Another problem:  Cahn, clearly, has written The Harbinger  as a warning for America.  That America is in a state of spiritual and moral decline is indisputable.  However, just how does a nation go about returning to God?  I think it’s a matter of individual, and not national, response.  Governments cannot legislate faith.  History has given us some sorry examples of governments who tried.    

 

 

 

    

 

         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

A Harbinger Not To Be Ignored

As I watched CNN’s coverage of Hurricane Isaac barreling towards the Louisiana coast seven years to the day after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans with such devastation, my thoughts turned to the ‘approaching storm’ described by Jonathan Cahn in his book The Harbinger.    I had purchased a copy of Cahn’s controversial work with a degree of hesitation, wondering, “Was this a worthwhile read, or was it just another case of someone making sensational—even wackypredictions of future events based on unsound biblical scholarship, and therefore best ignored?” I’m glad I didn’t ignore it, for I would have missed a truly thought-provoking book. 

 

In The Harbinger, Cahn proposes that the fates of two nations uniquely-favoured by God, ancient Israel and the USA, are mysteriously linked. Cahn makes such a linkage between the two nations, one ancient and one modern, based on the similarity between their responses to God’s signs, or harbingers, of impending judgment. In the Eighth Century BC, the northern kingdom of Israel had turned away from God.  In 732 BC, God removed the hedge of protection around ancient Israel, allowing the Assyrians to invade their land, but only on a small-scale and only temporarily. This breach in Israel’s security was meant to be a first warning sign to Israel to return to their Covenant LORD.  But instead of turning back to God after the calamity, the people of Israel, in a spirit of pride and arrogance, determined to rebuild bigger, better, stronger.  Their response is recorded in Isaiah 9:10:

 

            “The bricks have fallen down,

            But we will rebuild with smooth stones;

The sycamores have been cut down,

But we will replace them with cedars.” (NASB)

 

The northern kingdom of Israel ignored all nine harbingers sent by God. A mere ten years after the first ‘wake-up call’, the northern kingdom was annihilated by the Assyrians and subsequently disappeared from the face of the earth.  Cahn claims that the nine harbingers that appeared in the last days of ancient Israel are now appearing in America.  He regards the 9/11 terrorist attack as the first of nine harbingers sent by God to America, on a par with the Assyrian breach of the northern kingdom in 732 BC. 

 

As Cahn goes on to show, the parallels between the actions of ancient Israel and America are truly uncanny!  To cite only one of many parallels:  A number of prominent US leaders and politicians (or their speech writers, most likely), unaware of the passage’s connection to impending divine judgment, unwittingly quoted Isaiah 9:10 to inspire the American people post 9/11.  America has been given all nine harbingers that Israel received, and like Israel, responds with arrogant defiance.  But unlike ancient Israel, America still has time to return to God and thus avert judgment.

 

The parallels that Cahn finds between ancient Israel and America are remarkable. However, one problem I have with Cahn’s linkage of ancient Israel and the USA is this:  The prophet Isaiah delivered a specific message to a specific people at a specific point in history, the ancient northern kingdom of Israel in the 8th century.  Can we apply Isaiah’s prophetic utterances literally to 21st century America?  I’m not so sure.  Another problem:  Cahn, clearly, has written The Harbinger  as a warning for America.  That America is in a state of spiritual and moral decline is indisputable.  However, just how does a nation go about returning to God?  I think it’s a matter of individual, and not national, response.  Governments cannot legislate faith.  History has given us some sorry examples of governments who tried.    

 

     

 

     

 

Advertisements